Stereotypical

Nursing. School. Life.

NCLEX Practice Question of the Week

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Here is the weekly question posted on the NCSBN Learning Extension:

A client comes into the community health center upset and crying stating “I will die of cancer now that I have this disease.” And then the client hands a nurse a paper with one word written on it: “Pheochromocytoma.” Which response should the nurse state initially?

  1. “Pheochromocytomas usually aren’t cancerous (malignant). but they may be associated with cancerous tumors in other endocrine glands such as the thyroid (medullary carcinoma of the thyroid)”
  2. “This problem is diagnosed by blood an urine tests that reveal elevated levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline”
  3. “computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imagine (MRI) are used to detect an adrenal tumor”
  4. “You probably have had episodes of sweating, heart pounding and headaches.”

The answer is…

1 -Pheochromocytomas usually aren’t cancerous (malignant). But they may be associated with cancerous tumors in other endocrine glands such as the thyroid (medullary carcinoma of the thyroid)

What? You’ve never heard of Pheochromocytomas? Well, let me Wiki it for you:

It is a neuroendocrine tumor of the adrenal medulla. It originates in chromaffin cells, and secretes an excess for catecholemines (adrenaline & noradrenaline).

It is referred to as the “10% tumor,” due to:

  • Bilateral disease is present in approximately 10% of patients
  • Approximately 10% of tumours are malignant
  • Approximately 10% are located in chromaffin tissue outside of the adrenal gland (paragangliomas)
  • Approximately 10% arise in childhood usually the familial ones and a strong male preponderance
  • Approximately 10% are familial
  • Approximately 10% recur after being resected
  • Approximately 10% patients do not have hypertension (Campbell’s Urology)
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Written by stereotypicalone

May 5, 2009 at 00:34

Posted in NCLEX

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